About

Red Lips High Heels is a writers and artists’ movement that advocates peacebuilding, human rights in general and women’s rights in particular in Southwestern Asia, founded by Dr. Pamela Chrabieh, and formed by a group of individuals from various ethnic, religious, cultural, socio-economic and political backgrounds, established in the region and in diaspora. Academicians, lawyers, psychologists, artists, educators, employees of the private and public sectors, business women and housewives, students, men, women, and people of different sexual orientations and gender identities, all engaged for the same cause, that of improving the conditions and circumstances of human beings.

Goals of the movement:

  • Awareness and Empowerment.
  • Deconstructing taboos, prejudices and stereotypes.
  • Fighting against fear.
  • Building and disseminating a new applied knowledge – based on experiences, practices, personal stories, and on scientific and academic studies – and a culture of equal partnership between diverse identities – including gender equality – , which emanates from the context and responds to it.
  • Creating a platform of intercultural, inter-ethnic, inter-gender, transnational and glocal (global and local) dialogue, sharing and debate.

Red Lips High Heels’ blog and Facebook page are ‘spaces’ where individuals engage in creating, sharing and commenting on written and visual content from their various feminist and human rights/peacebuilding perspectives and with a diversity of feminist and human rights/peacebuilding commitments. One of the objectives of this movement is to facilitate dialogue and partnership across differences.

“Red Lips” are usually associated with a particular ‘type’ of woman – for centuries, red lips have largely been seen as a stamp of immorality -, which is not the case of this online platform. The Red Lips’ symbol is used here to encourage and celebrate self-possession, self-assurance, self-acceptance, vibrancy, transformation, courage, prowess and assertion. “Red Lips” draw attention to the mouth, and subsequently/metaphorically, to the voice that comes out of it.

“High Heels” have also been seen as oppressing women or demeaning them as sex objects. However, “High Heels” are used here as a symbol of seeking balance in one’s life and society – wearing high heels requires physical balance -, and empowerment when facing taboos, discrimination and violence – a power based on an autonomous and fearless walk.

Individuals part of the ‘Red Lips High Heels’ movement, authors of many articles, do not necessarily physically wear red lipstick and high heels. Diversity of feminisms and human rights/peacebuilding’ approaches is our motto. However, the unusual significance of ‘red lips’ and ‘high heels’ used here is a common point within this diversity. A kind of ‘unthinkable’ (what falls outside the enclosure) versus the ‘thinkable’ (what stands within the enclosure), which invites all to ‘unlearn’ traditional knowledge about women and human relations in Southwestern Asia and their relations to their environment and build alternative knowledge.